Slowchat Highlights

by | 05.31.16

As the school year ends, how do you reflect on everything you and your students have shared together—the learnings and growth, the difficult moments and the memorable ones—over the course of the year? In the last slowchat of the school year, hosted by teachers Lyndsay Nottingham and Sarah Thomas, we asked you to share your best tips for reflecting on the past nine months. Read on for eight of the Teacher2Teacher community’s responses and share your own in the comments below.

  1. “Ask students to reflect: their best/fav projects, the not-so-good, and [what] students wanted more of, with evidence.”—@Musicbearedu
  2. “Make a list. Discusses glows and grows with someone else. Jot down ideas for next year.”—@ShanaVWhite
  3. “Data records, conference notes, blogs that have or could have happen; ponder that ever-present question of how to serve better!”—@MrsDScholars
  4. “I’m going to try a video diary/recap this year, #movenote allows me to capture image and talk with it.”—@dene_gainey
  5. “Looking at projects, posters, coffee mugs, giant sticky notes and essays that clutter our class; forgotten items of memorable moments!”—@ivesenglish
  6. “Blogging is an excellent way to reflect every day! Check out @natblogcollab for free writing support!”—@lisa_hollenbach
  7. “I love looking through my camera roll at memories we’ve made and creating a photo collage of the year.”—@BonnySDieterich
  8. “Finding a hammock, a journal and a cool lemonade. I also spend time organizing my Google Drive.”—@teachem2fish

The #T2TChat is on hiatus for the summer—check back in early fall for more great conversations with your fellow teachers. And don’t forget to follow us on Twitter if you don’t already!


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Teacher2Teacher Team
Teacher2Teacher Team

Teacher2Teacher is a community that shares effective practices and innovations so educators can connect and grow together.


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